Concepts/sketches

Rough sketches of ideas

Snapchat: a social network coming of age story
What’s now
Snapchat is a unique social network that launched in 2011 and has steadily gained a following of loyal users. It originated as a way to hare photos directly with another user and temporarily before they were deleted. But its features have grown and the service has evolved to include a more public timeline of “My Story” (multiple photo/video “Snaps” composed chronologically and displayed to all of your followers), as well as the integration of various popular filters and features (eg FaceSwap). As the features have grown, so has uptake of the app; in 2016, Snapchat reached 10 billion daily video views among its users.
What’s broken
Snapchat has been wildly successful, but it is used almost solely by Millenials and Generation Z (those born from the late 1990s on). In the first couple of years after launch, Snapchat developed a reputation as the tool teenagers used to send “Sexts” and other things they wanted to hide from their parents and others. Many older people, who would now enjoy Snapchat’s broad functional offerings and unique take on social networking, still think of it this way.
What’s next
Snapchat wants to accelerate its user uptake among non-Millenials (ages 35+). This is a majority of the population, encompassing Gen Xers, Baby Boomers, and even elderly people—all of whom have been slow or resistant to start using Snapchat. The main communication point Snapchat wants to make is: Snapchat lets you see what your friends are up to in a different way than ever before
Uber: the potential pitfalls of the “share economy”
What’s now
Over the past few years, Uber has changed the way people everywhere find a ride. With its convenient and user-friendly
interface and ubiquitous car availability, people in major cities are turning to Uber before traditional taxis, and people in smaller cities (and even rural areas) are able to find a ride easier than ever before.
What’s broken
Despite its success, Uber is not without its critics. Its approach of employing thousands of independent contractor drivers faces strong criticism from many in the taxi and transportation industry. They are publicly calling into question whether consumers can rely on (and even trust) their Uber drivers, who are not always vetted as stringently as a full-time driver in a traditional car service might be. And several recent incidents of driver misconduct have been highly publicized and seized on by Uber’s competitors.
What’s next
Uber wants to put out an advertising campaign in major markets to make consumers feel confident and comfortable in choosing it over traditional taxi services. The main communication point they want to make is: Get a ride you can trust with Uber
Go Pro: Experience the moments you’re capturing

What’s now
Go Pro has been incredibly successful since launching in 2002. It was originally created to capture super close-up, live-action footage of athletes in some of the most exhilarating, previously unreachable moments. As a result, it has become somewhat niched for video documentation of extreme sports and action-adventure videography. But Go Pro is easy to use, delivers high-quality/high-definition footage, and, with increasing popularity, has become more affordable than ever before. With these traits—combined with its unique hands-free usability—Go Pro can and should be used for so much more.
What’s broken
In today’s world, people are completely consumed by the desire to capture and document their experiences. In fact, it sadly seems people are willing to compromise the joy of live experiences in order to get a good video or photo to share on social media. And the most popular device they’re using is their phones. People are viewing life through the screens of the smartphones they’re holding. People are no longer living in the moment—they’re simply capturing the moment with their phones. Phones, phones, everywhere. Phones.
What’s next
Go Pro is the only camera (for both video and photo) that allows consumers to put down their phones and engage with their experiences. With Go Pro, they can forget they’re filming and live in—and enjoy— the moments they’re trying to capture. Don't just capture life's moments—experience them with Go Pro
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